My Venice book featured

I wrote my Venice book (A Pianist’s Journal in Venice) over a year ago because I had a hundred watercolors I had dashed off in my travel journal in a heightened state while we were there, and many scribbled impressions, episodes, and a heckuva tale to tell. I have since given several musical programs based around the book, most notably the one at Steinway Hall in New York City, complete with Venetian masques, Italian pastries and prosecco.
It was a spectacular evening in that great landmark building with its elegant salon, equal to any I saw in Venice.

And then it was over, except for a couple of less elegant events and book signings and sales, and the listing on Amazon. I never expected much more to happen; I never market any of my books, or paintings, or CDs, aggressively; and thus I have gotten used to a certain lack of recognition and distribution for work that I believe is pretty well-done. In fact, as time passes, I realize that the best part of what I do and have done for so many years, is the work itself and I have gotten less “ambitious”, less interested in “fame”, (although “fortune” would be nice!!).

And so it is with sheer delight and surprise, that I have been treated to the spread that the magazine Clavier Companion has given to my book. In their January issue, Susan Geffen wrote a lovely review, and then “interviewed” me on the blog of the online edition of the magazine:
www.claviercompanion.com/connect/blog/51-a-conversation-with-carol-montparker
They also reproduced a few watercolors from the book which are linked onto the interview and review. Having scaled down my expectations, the occasional burst of acknowledgement really feels good.

One thought on “My Venice book featured

  1. I think you touch upon what Maslow was referring to in his “hierarchy of needs”. According to his theory, to know yourself inside and out and to do work for just the enjoyment itself, to be truly fulfilled without the need for recognition, is the highest peak one can achieve. Though, acknowledgment for one’s efforts is a basic human need, which he also touches upon. And it is well-deserved indeed!

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